A miraculous collection of the supreme gem, PRE WAR MARTIN!

Eternally coveted by guitarists and collectors around the world♪ Martin's Pre-War & Wartime models have miraculously arrived! And all four together!

Only 91 D-45s were made between 1933 and 1942, and it is said that only 70 of them are still in existence. The OOO-45 14F-jointed model, the second rarest after the D-45 and OM-45, was produced in a total of only 123 pieces from 1933 to 1942, while the D-18 and D-28 plew & watertime models were produced in very small numbers.

Most of them are owned by collectors, and it is extremely rare to find them on the vintage market. There are no so-called "for sale"! It is definitely a miracle that so many gems are gathered together at the same time and place! It is not difficult to imagine how risky it is to find such a rare item at an auction overseas. Now you can see them in person at THE used music store.

 
We were able to acquire this rare Pre-War & Wartime Martin because we have had strong connections with famous guitar dealers and prominent collectors in the U.S. and other countries for many years.
We will continue to search for even rarer and higher quality instruments upon your request through our cooperative network, so please do not hesitate to contact us.

Pre-War Auditorium with intense sound♪

Spec
Top: Bronze Adirondack spruce
Sides & Back: Adirondack Spruce Hakaranda
Neck: Hacaranda Mahogany
Fingerboard: Mahogany Ebony
Bridge: Ebony Ebony
Pegs: Ebony Grover Open Back
Weight: 1.5 lbs. 1.82Kg

 

The OOO-45 was produced from 1906 to 1942, with a total of 265 pieces, and only 123 pieces of the 14F model, making it the rarest model after the original D-45 and OM-45. In 1934, the 14-fret "OOO-45," which evolved from the OM model, was born with a solid head and vertical logo, and in 1935, the OOO-45 was introduced with a 12-fret joint, slotted head, and torch inlays. In 1935, the forward X bracing seems to have been discontinued on the OOO-45 model.

The small size and cohesive sound made it useful for recording purposes, and many people know that Eric Clapton, who is famous for his OOO-42, actually used an OOO-45, a modified OOO-28. This particular model also has a surprisingly rich volume for its OOO size, and combined with its linear response and delicacy, its sound is nothing short of amazing.

*Photographs have been removed at the purchaser's request.


Extremely rare original D-45, the ultimate dreadnought!

Spec.
Top: Bone Adirondack spruce
Sides & Back: Adirondack Spruce Hakaranda
Neck: Hacaranda Mahogany
Fingerboard: Mahogany Ebony
Bridge: Ebony Ebony
Pegs: Ebony Crewdson Deluxe (*replacement)
Weight 2.10Kg

The first D-45 was ordered by country singer Gene Autry in 1933, and 91 were produced until 1942. It is said that there are more than 70 of them in existence, and most of them are owned by collectors, making them a rare gem among gems that rarely appear on the general market.

The first 17 pieces until 1938 were snowflake inlaid, and one of them was owned by the late Red Smiley, a bluegrass player. However, when he acquired it, the snowflake had already been changed to hexagon. Only two D-45S (S stands for "Special") were made in 1936, and they are the rarest of the original D-45s, with a special 16 1/4" wide body. One of the two surviving D-45s is on display at the Martin Museum. Two D-45s with tortoiseshell headplates were also produced in conjunction with the 1940s, and are extremely rare.

 

 

Models up to mid-1938 featured forward-shifted X bracing. Scalloped bracing was used on all pieces until production ended in 1942. Grover pegs were originally open-back type, but closed type was used from 1939 to 1940.

At that time, the "45" series was subjected to more strict quality control and material requirements than any other Martin model, which is why only a small number of these instruments were produced and only skilled craftsmen were allowed to make them. The Hakaranda (Brazilian rosewood) on the sides and back are all quarter-sawn before the war, and the weather check of the paint is unique, unlike Gibson's. The texture of the paint seems to have blended in with the wood and fallen off. Also, the size of the Japanese avalon shells used for the inlays is particularly fine, and the brightness of the chips is completely different compared to recent models. It is interesting to see the actual piece.

The D-45 is known as a favorite of Crosby Stills Nash & Young and Clapton in the late '70s, and was reproduced in 1968 at the request of Mike Longworth and many others who were passionate about the D-45. The D-45 is the flagship model of the Martin line. The sound, achieved by the finest materials and Martin's outstanding craftsmanship, is above all transcendent, with a massive and radiant resonance.

*Photographs have been removed at the purchaser's request.


Rare shaded top specs!♪

Spec
Top: (1) Adirondack spruce
Sides & Back: Adirondack Spruce Mahogany
Neck: Mahogany Mahogany
Fingerboard: Mahogany Ebony
Bridge: Ebony Ebony
Pegs: Ebony Open back plastic buttons (*replacement)
Weight: 1.5 lbs. 1.73Kg

 

In 1931, a prototype "D-1" made by order of Ditson, a major dealer, was developed into the "D-18". 1932 saw the official production of the D-18 with a 12-fret joint, and in 1934, the D-18 with a 14-fret joint, which would later become the standard, was born. The first year's production of 14-fret D-18s was 42 pieces. The D-18 Sunburst presented here does not exist in the line at that time, and was ordered only as a special order, so it is very rare to exist.

 

 

 In 1938, a top plate brace (a flat reinforcement plate on the back of the top near the neck) was added, and models up to mid-1938 had forward-shifted X bracing. Fingerboard width narrows by about 1.5mm at the nut and 3.2mm at the 12th fret. 1940 price was $65 (D-28 $100). 1941 World War II began with the outbreak of war with Japan in December 1941, and the effects of metal shortages due to the war began to take their toll. 1942 saw the neck rod change from a steel T-bar to an ebony rod. In 1944, scalloped bracing was discontinued to prevent lack of strength when using heavy gauge guitars. 1946 saw the top wood changed from Adirondack spruce to Sitka spruce. In 1947, the ebony fingerboard and bridge on the D-18 were replaced by rosewood (at that time, Hakaranda).

The sides and back are made of quarter-sawn mahogany, and while the D-28 has a powerful sound with rich mids and lows, the D-18 has a more delicate sound characterized by sparkling highs. It has the nostalgia for fingerplays as well as strokes. Many artists have been captivated by the sound of the D-18, including early Elvis Presley, Simon & Garfunkel, and Takahiko Ishikawa.

*Photographs have been removed at the purchaser's request.


Ebony rod, due to metal shortage during the war.
Final scalloped bracing specs

Spec
Top: Bamboo Adirondack spruce
Sides & Back: Adirondack Spruce Hakaranda
Neck: Hacaranda Mahogany
Fingerboard: Mahogany Ebony
Bridge: Ebony Ebony
Pegs: Ebony Crewson open back plastic buttons
Weight: 1.5 lbs. 1.89Kg

 

The D-28, the basic of modern acoustic guitars, was born as the D-28, a dreadnought that was developed from the prototype "D-2" made in 1931 by order of Ditson, a major dealer. Records show that only 52 14-fret D-28s were produced in the first year.

In 1938, the top plate brace (a flat reinforcement plate on the back of the top near the neck) was added. 1939 saw the elimination of the forward-shifted X bracing. The width of the fingerboard narrowed by about 1.5mm at the nut and 3.2mm at the 12F. 1940 price was $100 (D-18 $65). 1940 saw the start of World War II with the outbreak of war with Japan in December 1941, and the effects of the metal shortages caused by the war began to appear.

 

 


In 1942, the neck rod was changed from steel T-bar to ebony; in late 1944, scalloped bracing was discontinued to prevent lack of strength when using heavy gauge. In 1946, the top wood is changed from Adirondack spruce to Sitka spruce. In 1947, the herringbone trim and zigzag backstrip of the D-28 is replaced by a black-and-white striped and checkered backstrip.

Numerous artists have been captivated by the sound of the D-28 up to the present day. Country's Hank Williams, bluegrass's Rector Flatt, folk's Rambling Jack Elliott, Bob Dylan, Clarence White, the Kingston Trio, Tony Rice, Jimmy Page, and the list goes on and on. The D-28 has a rich mid-low range and produces a powerful and well-balanced chord sound, and the tone of this particular instrument from that era is particularly deep, with a solid core and rich, natural overtones.